CELEBRATING 20 YEARS

MASS GENERAL BRIGHAM
CASE STUDY

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CUSTOMER:
MASS GENERAL BRIGHAM

COVIANT PRODUCT:
DIPLOMAT MFT ENTERPRISE EDITION

Mass General Brigham using managed file transfer as strategic technology

KEY REQUIREMENTS:

Easy to use for MGB staff and supply chain partners

SFTP support with secure deployment
Automated PGP encryption and key management
Audit trail to document HIPAA compliance
Robust job and file capacity to support many large, concurrent transfers

THE NUMBERS:

2000+ daily transfer workflows with 100+ users, including hundreds of vendors, partners, and federal agencies.

1 million+ files transferred per month
180+ PGP keys managed automatically

BENEFITS:

Compatible with insurance companies, CDC and NIH mandates, financial institution requirements, and other organizations requiring strong security and encryption standards including PGP
Supports digital supply chain security by extending capabilities to smaller entities, thus enabling and encouraging autonomous operations
Operates equally well with on-premises and cloud-based applications
Simplicity and process automations enhance security efforts
Consistent with HIPAA mandates for security and auditability
Big help in supporting major cloud migration

Background

Formed in 1994 with the merger of Massachusetts General Hospital and Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston-based Mass General Brigham (MGB) is the largest private employer in Massachusetts with a workforce of approximately 75,000. Comprising 16 hospitals, research and teaching facilities, and multiple affiliated health centers, medical offices, and other facilities located throughout New England, MGB has earned a stellar reputation that transcends patient care to include world renowned specialized medicine, rehabilitation, education, research, and a top-rated health plan.

The Requirements

As a healthcare organization, Mass General Brigham is required to file regular reports with the Centers for Disease Control (CDC), National Institutes for Health (NIH), Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), and other federal and state agencies.

They share data with many insurance carriers, private medical practices, financial organizations, and hundreds of contractors, vendors, and suppliers that keep a hospital running.

Then, with passage of the Affordable Care Act in 2010 and a federal mandate to migrate to electronic health records (EHRs)—while maintaining compliance with the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA), the urgency around file transfers changed. Not only did the volume and variety of file transfers increase exponentially, the emphasis on security and reliability became a priority. As a high-profile healthcare network and major research hospital, Tony understood the implications of a data breach.

The Solution

Mass General Brigham chose Coviant Software after a competitive evaluation. Diplomat MFT delivered security, reliability, and enterprise-grade capacity, and included several automations to ensure accuracy and ease of use for complicated processes. For example, PGP encryption and encryption key management—often a difficult command-line process or handled with expensive tools—is built into Diplomat MFT, streamlining MGB’s use of 180 different PGP keys for different vendors. That helps keep MGB’s extensive digital supply chain more secure.

Because Diplomat MFT is built using standard protocols, engineered with a secure-by-design philosophy, and integrates easily with many common on-premises and cloud-based services and applications, it has enabled MGB to adopt digital transformations more easily, including a shift from on-premises to cloud-based applications.

Achieve HIPAA & HITECH Compliance with Diplomat MFT

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